Tiny House Summer Camp 4

Tuesday, November 1, 2011

Burn Baby Burn- Scandia Inferno! Our Vermont Cabin Finally Gets A Wood Stove.

My Vermont cabin in shut-down mode (for the coming winter).
      Dustin and I trekked up to my Vermont camp/cabin this past weekend (despite the 20 degree weather) and continued some work on our tiny house/vacation hut up there. This time around, we actually got a ton done, from installing a (recycled) door, to framing out (trim and all) a huge Anderson window that Dustin nabbed on craigslist for about $50.00. Those windows usually run about $1200.00 new! Its certainly pays to scrounge, seek, and buy second hand....


     We also managed to install a wood stove (finally!), and ran a long run of flue pipe from it so as to maximize the heat output (to let it radiate indoors, instead of out). While the new section of the cabin is far from done/sealed, it still is great to have that wood stove in there. We worked at night setting it up by gas-lantern lights (we have no electricity), and celebrated with a beer or two, in front of this cast iron beast. Those Coleman Lanterns have saved our asses and extended our work hours (and productivity) so many times- and they've taken a beating from us- and still are going strong! I posted, for the sake of convenience, a link to the exact model I have, below. I own two of these- one of them is about fourteen years old now, and still works great. The amount of light these give off really is incredible- in fact, all of the night shots of our "Tiny Yellow House" Vermont Cabin episode were shot under lantern light- and nothing but.

Working on the wood stove's flue- in 28 degree weather on night #2.
 Its a Scandia, which, as I understand, is more or less a lesser priced rip-off of Yotuls, and other models. I grabbed this particular stove from a neighbor for $50.

I was also able to take an array of other photos while we were in Vermont, from some cool treehouses I spotted, to the pumpkin hut/gazebo in the last post, and more. I'll work on getting those up here soon.

Dustin works on getting the stove's first fire (in THIS cabin) going to test out the flue
 -Derek "Deek" Diedricksen

$11.53- the NEW edition of my book- on Amazon.com (the link in the left hand column of this blog)
Here's the model I own- again, I ONLY post links to items I REALLY love, and that have proven their worth by being helpful in many of my building and outdoor projects. I'm actually going to buy a third one of these soon, for our larger backwoods Vermont gatherings. If you can find the old models, used, grab them up. My Vermont neighbor "Uncle Bob" has a Coleman that's almost FIFTY YEARS old- that he still uses.

4 comments:

  1. Great post. I know the feeling of installed a wood stove on a cold dark night and being so glad all the pieces fit because you have no other source of heat! We did the same in our place. That's a great looking stove.

    I like the look of your floor and interior paneling too. We got ours for free but its pretty dark panelling from an old garage here in seattle and the floor is cherry so its very dark too. Lighter would be better but free it good.

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  2. Tremendous, magnificent, marvelous, extraordinary, amazing are the word this post deserve. This made me think that verity can be created from scratch.
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  3. Great Article!
    I was also able to take an range of other images while we were in Vermont, from some awesome treehouses I noticed, to the pumpkin hut/gazebo in the last publish, and more. I'll operate on getting those up here soon.

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  4. Excellent article. I know the sensation of set up a timber range on a freezing darkish evening and being so happy all the bits fit because you have no other supply of heat! We did the same in our location. That's an excellent looking range.
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